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Four sentenced in Brier Creek bust

The lone female defendant among four charged in a February drug bust will spend two years in jail, the longest time for any of her cohorts.

Euricka Patrice Harris, 26, of Farmville, pleaded guilty on Aug. 22, to three of the eight charges levied against her when she was arrested on Feb. 3, along with Tim Latonda Woodson, 37, also of Farmville; Edwin Lee Hayer, 32, of Blackstone; and Adam Perasall, 25, of Farmville.

Adam Perasall

Adam
Perasall

Edwin Lee Hayer Jr.

Edwin Lee Hayer Jr.

Tim Latonda Woodson

Tim Latonda Woodson

Euricka Patrice Harris

Euricka Patrice Harris

Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) deputies arrested them following the bust at 81 Brier Creek Road in Cumberland where police seized cocaine, a large amount of marijuana, scales, cash, about 30 boxes of ammunition, a gun and numerous reported stolen goods.

Drugs and related materials seized at the scene included a large amount of marijuana pre-packaged for sale, a large amount of cash, scales and hot plates with white powder residue assumed to be cocaine for making crack cocaine.

Stolen goods found at the scene included a large number of brand-new pieces of power equipment and tools still in their packaging. The stolen goods may have come from thefts in Buckingham, Fluvanna, Nottoway, Prince Edward, Charlotte and Lunenburg counties, police said. Deputies and troopers also found 12 vehicles with open titles.

Brier Creek Road is located off of Asal Road, north of Raines Tavern; the bust was conducted by CCSO deputies and state troopers.

Deputies charged Harris with obstructing justice, being a felon in possession of a weapon, selling or distributing marijuana, manufacturing controlled substances, conspiring to manufacture controlled substances, child abuse with disregard for life, distribution or possession with intent to distribute between one-half ounce to 5 pounds of marijuana and possession with intent to distribute Schedule I or II drugs.

Harris was found not guilty of the obstruction of justice charge in general district court on April 28. That was also where the manufacture of a controlled substance and the sale or distribution of marijuana charges were dismissed. No disposition could be found in online circuit court records of the conspiracy to manufacture controlled substances charge.

The weapon possessed by a felon charge was nolle prosequi, or not prosecuted, on Aug. 22.

On that date, Harris pleaded guilty to child abuse with disregard to life and sentenced the same day to five years in prison with three years suspended, leaving her to actively serve two years, after which she will be placed on indefinite supervised probation. She also pled guilty to distribution or possession with intent to distribute one-half ounce to 5 pounds of marijuana and was sentenced to 10 years, all of which was suspended upon indefinite supervised probation. Instead of pleading guilty to the possession with intent to manufacture Schedule I or II drugs, she pled guilty to the lesser charge of possession of those types of drug and, again, sentenced to 10 years, all suspended upon indefinite supervised probation.

Woodson, Hayer and Perasall faced similar charges to Harris’ with some differences.

On April 28, in general district court, Woodson was found not guilty of obstructing justice and a charge of selling or distributing marijuana was dismissed. The remainder of Woodson’s charges were handled in circuit court on Aug. 8.

That day, charges of being a felon in possession of weapons or ammunition and manufacturing controlled substances were not prosecuted. As with Harris, a charge of conspiracy to manufacture controlled substances could not be found in circuit court records despite being listed as forwarded from general district court.

Woodson also pleaded guilty to child abuse with disregard to life. A judge sentenced him on Oct. 25 to five years in prison with all five years suspended upon indefinite supervised probation. He also pleaded guilty to three counts of distribution or possession with intent to distribute one-half ounce to 5 pounds of marijuana for incidents dating back to 2014 — March 1, June 2 and June 9. A judge sentenced him to 10 years in prison, all suspended upon indefinite supervised probation.

Woodson pleaded guilty to a fourth marijuana distribution charge in connection with the February bust and, again, was sentenced to 10 years, all suspended upon indefinite supervised probation.

However, Woodson will spend an active one year sentence on three counts related to the bust: possession with intent to manufacture Schedule I or II substances and two counts of buying or receiving stolen goods. In each case, Woodson was sentenced to 10 years in prison, with nine years being suspended plus indefinite supervised probation after he leaves jail.

As with Harris and Woodson, Hayer’s obstruction of justice and felon in possession of weapon or ammunition charges were not prosecuted on June 9 and Nov. 1 in general district and circuit court, respectively. He pleaded guilty Nov. 1 to the sale or distribution of less than one-half ounce of marijuana and sentenced the same day to 12 months in jail, all suspended.

Also not prosecuted were charges of conspiracy to manufacture controlled substances and driving under a revoked or suspended license.

Originally charged with the manufacture of controlled substances, he pleaded guilty to a lesser charge of possession of Schedule I and II drugs. A judge sentenced him to five years in prison, with four years and nine months suspended, leaving a three-month active sentence and two years of supervised probation.

All four of Perasall’s charges were dealt with in general district court on June 23. Charges of obstructing justice, manufacture of controlled substances and conspiracy to manufacture controlled substances were not prosecuted. Originally charged with the sale or distribution of marijuana, Perasall pleaded guilty to marijuana possession and was sentenced to 12 months with eight months suspended as well as 12 months unsupervised probation.