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Local residents become state troopers

Several local residents graduated as Virginia State Troopers in early January.

Dakota Lewis Vaughn

Dakota Lewis Vaughn

Clinton Thackston

Clinton Thackston

Earl Thornton

Earl Thornton

Aaron Hallman

Aaron Hallman

Rebecca Mann

Rebecca Mann

State police graduated 74 new troopers and one Special Agent Accountant at its academy in North Chesterfield County.

Greensville County’s newest trooper is Trooper Earl La-Neal Thornton, 24, of Cumberland County.

“Trooper Thornton pursued a career with the state police ‘…to help people in need,’” the release stated.

“Inspired by a family member who served in law enforcement, Trooper Clinton S. Thackston chose a career with the state police. The 24-year-old Farmville native is a graduate of Virginia Tech and is proud to be a member of ‘such a strong, respected organization.’ Trooper Thackston begins his patrol assignment in Buckingham County.”

For Trooper Aaron B. Hallman, 27, of Buckingham County, joining the Virginia State Police runs in the family, according to the release.

“His brother, Trooper E. Hallman, is assigned to the department’s Wytheville Division and presented Aaron his diploma Friday. Trooper A.B. Hallman’s motivation to become a trooper is for the opportunity to “fulfill a sense of duty and to give back to the community.” He begins his first patrol assignment in Nelson County.”

Trooper Rebecca S. Mann, 25, is reporting for duty in Appomattox County Monday. The Charlotte County native of Phenix joined the state police after serving as a deputy with the Charlotte County Sheriff’s Office.

Trooper Dakota Lewis Vaughn, of Giles County, has been assigned to Buckingham.

“Upon receiving their diplomas, members of the 123rd Basic Session finish a rigorous 28-week training session,” a State Police press release states.

“The new troopers have received instruction in more than 100 different subjects spanning hundreds of hours. Academy training includes such areas as crime scene investigation, survival Spanish, judicial procedures, self defense, cultural diversity and firearms.”

“The area natives begin for their final phase of training Tuesday, Jan. 19, when they report to their respective duty assignments. Each will spend the next six weeks with a field training officer learning his or her new patrol area and day-to-day duties.”