• 48°

Help in restoring voting rights

Editor:

The midterm elections are about a month away, so it’s the perfect time to remind readers that many Virginians still can’t take part in what is the most important part of the democratic process: voting.

When a person is convicted of a felony in Virginia, state law revokes their civil rights—including the right to vote. And unlike most states, the restoring of voting rights does not come automatically upon completion of one’s sentence. Instead, disenfranchised Virginians must ask the governor to restore his or her rights.

People with prior felony convictions should not feel that the rights restoration process is hopeless. In fact, it’s easier than ever for previously convicted Virginians to apply to restore their rights through the Secretary of the Commonwealth’s website. Anyone who is confused about the process or has questions can reach out to Revive My Vote, a nonpartisan student volunteer project at William & Mary Law School.

By calling our hotline, disenfranchised Virginians can find the status of their voting rights and apply to get them back if need be. Although thousands of Virginians have already regained the right to vote, there are still many more who are eligible.

Restoring your voting rights has never been easier; if you or someone you know needs help in doing so, leave us a message at (844) 932-8683 or revivemyvote. com. We’re happy to assist you, no matter whom you’d like to vote for.

Zach McDonnell

Williamsburg