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Langhorn seeks musical fame

Although Tyler Langhorn is still figuring out what kind of man he will become, he knows he wants to be involved in his community in as many ways as possible.

“I really bought into the mantra at H-SC about figuring out what type of man you want to become — I ask myself that question often,” the Hampden Sydney College senior said.

Tyler Langhorn

Tyler Langhorn

He has dedicated himself to becoming a better person, a trait he says not all his fellow classmates have adopted, but for those who have, it shows.

The 22-year-old’s real passion lies in making music. He writes country and alternative songs for fun, but he hasn’t worked in those genres in a while.

“I am currently pursuing a professional career in rap, hip-hop and R&B music,” said Langhorn, who will obtain a degree in government from H-SC.

“This government degree is for later in life when I want to go into politics, and I’ll have a base for that,” he said. “In my heart, I’m an artist, and that’s why I care so much.”

In the past, he has performed slam poetry at Uptown Coffee Café’s open mic nights, but hopes his passion will take him all the way to Los Angeles following graduation this spring.

Langhorn is searching for an internship or job in a recording studio. He hopes, through his music, he can bring out people’s inner smile.

In the meantime, he is president of both the Union Philanthropic Literary Society — the longest continuously running debate society in the country — and of the Minority Student Union.

Langhorn, from Roanoke, works in a theater, as a resident adviser and is sports announcer for the school

“I also am a member of Garnet and Grey, which is our tour guide society on campus. I used to be very involved in Chi-Alpha, the Christian organization, and I really just enjoy being part of the campus as a whole,” he said.

He’s a part of the college activities committee, the student advisory community and has helped with amendments to the Student Life Master Plan.

In his free time, he works as a master of ceremony for various events.

“I really took advantage of the ability to be involved in anything and everything, which separates me from a few people at H-SC,” Langhorn said.

Prince Edward County’s history has inspired Langhorn.

“The whole case surrounding the Moton School was very influential and I think it explains a lot about the area,” he said. “It seems to me that there is a lot of untapped potential and a great deal of diversity that should really be capitalized and exploited in a positive way.”

Langhorn said his experience at H-SC has been unique.

“Because H-SC is harder and it makes you work harder,” he explained.

That environment has changed his perspective on world issues and relationships in addition to how he interacts with society.

One of Langhorn’s favorite memories from college so far is watching the sun set and the moon rise over Briery Creek with a girl he met from Longwood University.

“Either that or the ‘Am I Next?’ March that took place on Main Street,” he said, referring to an early 2016 peace walk.

Langhorn said he appreciates his past three years at H-SC.

“This degree from H-SC is for everyone who supported me,” he said.

Langhorn’s mother is a strong believer in the value of education, and his father, who is battling prostate cancer, has made sacrifices to help Langhorn finish school.

“It’s for my little sister who looks up to me, not knowing that I look up to her and am inspired by her every day,” he added.

Langhorn said he’s “blessed by God, and thankful for every day, every person, and everything.” He said he doesn’t want to take any of his opportunities for granted.